Video: Resurrection of Hope

When Jesus died, it was an event of cataclysmic proportion. The rocks splits, the earth shook, the curtain in the temple was torn from top to bottom, and the graves of many saints gave back their dead. “Creation, the cosmos, mourned the death of its creator.”

On that day many believers lost hope – On that day, many people went into hiding, living in fear. But God, on the third day, brought Jesus back to life. On the third day, Hope was resurrected, and the course of human history was fundamentally altered.

The resurrection of Christ is all about hope. It reminds us, even when things are grim there is no need to despair, because we have hope that things will get better.

The resurrection of Christ is all about hope. Knowing that Christ rose from the dead, we have peace to weather the storm, because the same God who rose Jesus from the dead has the power to say “Peace, be still”

The resurrection of Christ is all about hope. We know the apostles were mourning and crying on Friday night but they rejoiced on Sunday morning. Therefore, we can say with confidence that “Weeping may last for a night, but joy comes in the morning.”

The stone rolled away – up from the grave He arose – He arose, a victor from the dark domain. Every song about the resurrection of Christ ought to fill our hearts with joy and nothing but hope. That’s why we celebrate it every Sunday when we take the Lords Supper – to remind us all that there is hope in our future

The resurrection of Christ is all about hope. We know that death could not keep Jesus in the grave; therefore, we can rest assured that death will not be the end of the story. Our hope is firm, because of what we know about the God that we serve.

The resurrection of Christ is all about hope, and hope gives us the willpower to persevere through the darkest valleys of life, especially the one that we are currently going through. Lord, we thank you for the resurrection of hope, because hope will always triumph in the face of trouble.

Walking Through the Valley: Psalm 23

It was the beginning of fall last year, on a beautiful sunny Saturday, my wife and I invited our best friends to go hiking with us. We drove to Hamden and parked right across from Quinnipiac University, and we went on a hike up “Sleeping Giant State Park.” The road up the mountain is a little rugged but it’s not that hard of a hike, and having companions along the way to converse with certainly made it easier to bear. On the mountaintop there is a castle, I believe, and anyone can make their way to the roof of that ancient structure in order to explore. Sitting on the roof of that edifice on the mountaintop was quiet an experience, because the air is crisp, the view is indescribable, and the breeze feels like a reward for making it up there. Being on the mountaintop, I just wanted to stay up there for as long as possible, not only to enjoy the infinite beauty of God’s creation but also to escape for a brief moment the reality that awaits in the valley below.
            We all have had mountaintop experiences in our lives, and we also understand the opposite is true and inevitable: walking through the valleys of life. Mountaintop experiences are moments in life when we can clearly grasp God’s power and blessings in our lives. From a biblical perspective, a mountaintop experience can be transcendent because it is outside of the realm of what the human mind can comprehend. Elijah had a mountaintop experience with God on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18. 19), where he experienced the very power of God who gave him the victory over his enemies. Moses had a mountaintop experience on Mount Sinai (Exodus 19, 31, 32), where he experienced the very presence of God. Also, let us not forget Jesus’ mountaintop experience with his disciples Peter, James, and John (Mark 9), where the Son of God experienced what we now know as “The Transfiguration.” It was such a beautiful and transcendent moment that Peter said “It is good for us to be up here,” and he wanted to put up a few shelters and stay up there on the mountaintop with Jesus, Moses, and Elijah. Like Peter, we all wish mountaintops were more permanent. Also, just like Peter, Moses, and Elijah, we cannot escape the difficult reality and challenges of life that await us all in the valley below. When Elijah got down in the valley, he had to deal with death threats from Jezebel. Moses had to deal with a sinful and ungrateful people whom God had just led out of Egypt. Jesus had to go back to work healing folks and facing the reality of this death.
            Maybe mountaintop experiences are meant to prepare us for the valleys below. We all have experienced God’s hands and blessings in our lives, and currently we are all going through this valley of virus together. It is easy to profess our faith on the mountaintop when things are lean and great, but now that we are going through this dark valley together our faith is being tested. Can we boldly proclaim together “Though I walk through the valley of death, I will fear no evil: for you are with me” (Ps 23: 4). If I may, let me rephrase this verse: “Though we walk through the valley of COVID-19, we will fear no evil; for God is with us.” Beloved, currently our faith is being put through the test in order to prove how genuine it is, because only walking through the valleys of life can our faith be truly tested (1 Peter 1: 6 – 7) . Remember, the God of the mountaintop is the same God down in the valley (1 Kings 20: 23 – 28). The same reason we know we were safe and secure on the mountaintop ought to be the same reason we are safe and secure walking through this valley of virus today: God is with us, always.

Grace, Peace, and Love
Donny Pierre

7 Promises of God to Believe in (Part II)

 According to the dictionary, a promise is “a declaration or assurance that one will do a particular thing or that a particular thing will happen.” How can we be sure that God will do what He said he would do? What kind of assurance do we have that God will keep His promises? The bible says that “God is not a man that He should lie” (Num 23: 19). Every promise that God has made will come to pass (Joshua 21: 44).

When someone makes a promise, there are three simple things we must always consider in order to determine whether or not we can hold this person to their promises: a) Their ability to keep the promise, b) Their willingness to do it, and c) Their history with promises. We serve a God who is both able (2 Timothy 1: 12) and willing (Matthew 1: 1 – 4). More importantly, we serve a God with a long history of making and keeping promises, not only in the Bible but also in our own lives. I believe if we take the time to count our blessings, write them down, we will realize tha

t God has been true in his promises in our lives all along. Therefore, we can rest assured that God will continue to deliver on all his promises. It is my prayer that God’s promises will keep on transforming our lives while strengthening our faith in order to eradicate all fear and anxiety. God does want us to be cautious, He does want us to be alert and vigilant, but he does not want us to live in fear. God did not give us a spirit of fear but of power and love (2 Tim 1: 7). Let us continue to stand on the promises of God.

Grace, Peace, and Love
Donny Pierre  

Powerpoint slides for today’s lesson…

7-promises-of-God-to-believe-part-2

The Promises of God: Psalm 91

According to the dictionary, a promise is “a declaration or assurance that one will do a particular thing or that a particular thing will happen.” We all have made several promises to different people in our lives, and truth be told we haven’t always been able to keep those promises. In the Bible God made hundreds of promises to us, and He is always true to His promises, unlike us. We can believe in the promises of God, because the bible says in Numbers 23: 19, “Has God spoken and failed to act? Has He ever promised and not carried it through?” Also, in the book of Joshua 21:44, we are reminded that “Not a single one of all the good promises the Lord had given to the family of Israel was left unfulfilled; everything he had spoken came true.”


When someone makes a promise, there are three simple things we must always consider in order to determine whether or not we can hold this person to their promises: a) Their ability to keep the promise, b) Their willingness to do it, and c) Their history with promises. We serve a God who is both able (2 Timothy 1: 12) and willing (Matthew 1: 1 – 4). In Genesis 18: 9 – 15, when God made a solemn promise to Abraham that He will give them a son, Sarah laughed because she did not believe in God’s ability to keep that promise. The truth is, she had valid reasons to question God’s ability and willingness to keep that promise: Abraham and Sarah were old in age, and Sarah was barren. God responded with an emphatic rhetorical question: “Is anything too hard for the Lord? Thinking about this story, we can clearly see that Sarah was limiting God’s ability within the parameters of the laws of nature, but what is impossible with men is possible with God (Matthew 19: 26). Like Sarah, we too are human beings who need to be reminded that natural laws, human limitations and impotence cannot and will never limit God’s ability and willingness to keep his promises and respond to our needs.


More importantly, we also serve a God with a long history of making and keeping promises, not only in the Bible but also in our own lives. I believe if we take the time to count our blessings, write them down, we will realize that God has been true to His promises in our lives all along. Therefore, we can rest assured that God will continue to deliver on all his promises. However, we must understand that many of God’s promises are conditional. For example, in Psalm 91 we read that “If you make the Lord your refuge, God will send his angels to protect you – because you love God, He will rescue you – If you acknowledge His name, He will protect you.” These are just a few example in the 91st Psalm. Yes, God is able – Yes, God is willing – Yes, God has been true to his promises so far. However, we must make God our refuge, we must acknowledge Him as Lord and Savior, and we must Love God with all our hearts, minds, and strength. Let us keep on believing in the promises of God, and never waiver in our faith (Romans 4: 18 – 21). Let us keep on believing in the promises found in Psalm 91.

Grace, Peace and Love
Donny Pierre

7 PROMISES OF GOD TO BELIEVE IN (PSALM 91)

I am so amazed at how God has been keeping us in fellowship with one another, regardless of the fact that we cannot see each other face to face. I am so thankful for our leadership during this time and all the work they have been doing to make sure we maintain our unity as a Church using different technological platform. We, as a Church, will get through this and let us faithfully praise God for what He is about to do in this unfortunate situation.

Join us for worship this Sunday morning online at 10:30 AM, www.waterburychurch.org. Several of us enjoyed an excellent time studying the bible this past Wednesday night online, and this Sunday morning we are going to worship our creator and talk about “7 promises to believe in.” The Bible is filled with powerful promises that God made to us, and many of them are conditional. In Psalm 91, there are 7 important promises we need to be reminded of in order to bolster our faith and eradicate all fear and anxiety. Remember the words of Christ to his disciples who were fearful during the storm on the Sea of Galilee, “Why are you so afraid, do you still have no faith” (Mark 4: 39).

See you all Online Sunday morning, Lord Willing
Grace, Peace, and Love
Donny Pierre